Posts Tagged ‘sleep patterns’

Nightmares are common!

How many of us as a child have had Nightmares (bad dreams) and ran to our parents room to find comfort  in the middle of the night?  Well, I sure have!

What Exactly Is a Nightmare?

Almost everyone gets them once in a while — adults, as well as kids.  A nightmare is a bad dream.  It can may make you feel scared, or upset, but nightmares are not real and can’t harm you!

While you sleep, your brain doesn’t just turn off.  It goes through several sleep stages, including REM, or Rapid Eye Movement, sleep.  Why do they call it that?  Because during this stage of sleep, your eyes move back and forth under your closed eyelids. During REM sleep, you have dreams and sometimes those dreams can be scary or upsetting.

About every 90 minutes your brain switches between non-REM sleep and REM sleep.  The amount of time spent in REM sleep increases with each sleep cycle through the night. The longest periods of REM sleep occur towards morning. If you wake during this REM stage, it is easier for you to remember what you were dreaming about.  That’s why your most vivid dreams — and nightmares — occur in the early morning hours.

Remedies:   Read or watch something inspiring. You can also visualize a tranquil scene or imagine yourself doing something you enjoy. Whatever you’re thinking just prior to sleep can have a huge impact on your dreams.  Thinking negative thoughts while you fall asleep are often causes of bad dreams!

-The Futon Man

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Sleeping Tips!

Here are a couple of tips to help you get a good nights rest!

  • Set a regular bedtime. Go to bed at the same time every night.  Find a time when you normally feel tired, so that you don’t toss and turn.  Try not to break this routine on weekends when it may be tempting to stay up late. If you want to change your bedtime, help your body adjust by making the change in small daily increments, such as 15 minutes earlier or later each day.
  • Wake up at the same time every day.  If you’re getting enough sleep, you should wake up naturally without an alarm.  If you need an alarm clock to wake up on time, you may need to set an earlier bedtime.  As with your bedtime, try to maintain your regular wake–time even on weekends.
  • Nap to make up for lost sleep.  If you need to make up for a few lost hours, opt for a daytime nap rather than sleeping late. This strategy allows you to pay off your sleep debt without disturbing your natural sleep–wake rhythm, which often backfires in insomnia and throws you off for days.
  • Be smart about napping. While taking a nap can be a great way to recharge, especially for older adults, it can make insomnia worse. If insomnia is a problem for you, consider eliminating napping. If you must nap, do it in the early afternoon, and limit it to thirty minutes.
  • Fight after–dinner drowsiness. If you find yourself getting sleepy way before your bedtime, get off the couch and do something mildly stimulating to avoid falling asleep, such as washing the dishes, calling a friend, or getting clothes ready for the next day. If you give in to the drowsiness, you may wake up later in the night and have trouble getting back to sleep.

If the tips don’t help, you might want to take a look at your mattress?  It could be to firm or soft?

 

Come by The Futon Shop and try out a Organic Mattress today!

-The Futon Man

Snore much?

Yes I do, I know I do!  I have waken myself up with my snores…  Whether or not you snore or your partner snores it’s not pleasant.  The good news is that there are a few things you can do to help!

  • Try to lose weight. Losing even a little bit of weight can reduce fatty tissue in the back of the throat and decrease snoring. See Healthy Weight Loss Your Way for some tips on getting started. Exercise in general can help because toning arms, legs, and abs inadvertently leads to toning muscles you don’t see in the throat, which leads to less snoring.
  • Clear nasal passages. Having a stuffy nose makes breathing difficult and creates a vacuum in your throat, which in turn leads to snoring. Rry nasal decongestants or nasal strips to help you breathe more easily while sleeping.
  • Quit smoking. If you smoke, your chances of snoring are high. Smoking causes airways to be blocked by irritating the membranes in the nose and throat.
  • Establish regular sleep patterns. Create a bedtime ritual with your partner and stick to it. Hitting the sack in a routine way together can promote better sleep and therefore minimize snoring.
  • Keep bedroom air moist with a humidifier. Dry air can irritate membranes in the nose and throat.
  • Reposition. Elevating your head four inches may ease breathing and encourage your tongue and jaw to move forward. (Tip: go pillow-free or try a specially designed pillow to make sure your neck muscles are not crimped).

Check out: www.helpguide.org for more sleeping tips!

-The Futon Man

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